GIS News

February 2017 Living Atlas Community Webinar Recording Now Available!

Feb 24 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at ArcGIS Blog under tags  arcgis online cartographic design living atlas living atlas community webinar living atlas of the world

The recording of the February 2017 Living Atlas Community Webinar is now available! In this webinar, Jim Herries, Lisa Berry, and Jennifer Bell of Esri’s ArcGIS Content Team presented Esri’s latest SmartMapping techniques and showed how you can use them with Living Atlas layers … Continue reading


Google Sues Uber Over Lidar IP

Feb 24 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at In The Scan under tags  autonomous vehicles

Google parent Alphabet’s Waymo business unit filed a lawsuit claiming that a former employee of Google stole some 14,000 files concerning their lidar-based self-driving navigation system. They claim the former Google employee and founder of Otto, the self driving trucking … Continue reading

The post Google Sues Uber Over Lidar IP appeared first on In The Scan.


Post-Brexit EU Map Shows Independent Scotland

Feb 24 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at The Map Room under tags  brexit eu europe scotland uk

A new post-Brexit map of the European Union shows Scotland as an EU member separate and independent from a rump “United Kingdom of England, Wales and Northern Ireland,” which is coloured like other non-EU members. Commissioned by Interkart and produced by XYZ Maps, the 119 × 84 cm wall map costs £24/40€. Interkart, XYZ Maps. [WMS]


Drone Revolution eBook

Feb 24 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at In The Scan under tags  airborne lidar autonomous vehicles uas uavs

Note – This information is being provided by Aerial Services, Inc. Free Drones Revolution eBook! This eBook is a compilation of articles written by Mike Tully, President & CEO of Aerial Services, Inc., over the last two years about drones … Continue reading

The post Drone Revolution eBook appeared first on In The Scan.


Impervious Surface Mapping using Pro 1.4 – Part 1: Georeferencing

Feb 24 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at ArcGIS Blog under tags  analysis & geoprocessing arcgis pro classification control points error analysis

ArcGIS Pro combines powerful image processing, analysis and visualization capabilities with a practical user interface to enable efficient project workflows.  The Imagery tab is the home for image processing workflows and tasks, such as georeferencing and image classification. The goal … Continue reading


Step by step guide to complete your first drone mapping project

Feb 23 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at Geoawesomeness under tags  datamapper drone mapping drones featured precisionhawk

So you’ve heard about drone mapping, and you want to try it yourself, but you don’t know how to start. This step by step guide will help you do the first step. Basic level drone mapping is easier than you think. In fact, if you own one of the popular models of DJI Phantom 3, […]

The post Step by step guide to complete your first drone mapping project appeared first on Geoawesomeness.


Content for the Planet Comes to Life with Redesigned Living Atlas Website

Feb 23 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at ArcGIS Blog under tags  3d gis analysis & geoprocessing apps arcgis online arcgis pro

Discovery and Contribution is now effortless The redesigned Living Atlas of the World website has been released. The goals of the redesign were to make it easier to discover Living Atlas content and contribute items to the Living Atlas. The … Continue reading


Gaining Local Insight for Business

Feb 23 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at Esri Insider under tags  arcgis demography gis industry focus location analysis

Many businesses have gleaned great returns by looking at operations through the lens of geographic science. The largest wins take on mythical status, as the impacts can be so profound that users want to keep the secret behind these rewards … Continue reading


How Google Maps APIs are fighting HIV in Kenya

Feb 23 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  google cloud maps

In 2015, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) and mobile analytics solutions provider iVEDiX  came together to create the HIV Situation Room, a mobile app designed to help fight the HIV epidemic in Kenya. The app uses Google Maps APIs to create a comprehensive picture of HIV prevention efforts, testing and treatment — and make this programmatic data accessible both to local staff in clinics and others on the front lines, as well as to policy makers.

We sat down with Taavi Erkkola, senior advisor on monitoring and evaluation for UNAIDS, and Brian Annechino, director of government and public sector solutions for iVEDiX, to hear more about the project and why they chose Google Maps APIs to help them in the fight against HIV.

How did the idea for the UNAIDS HIV Situation Room app come about?

Taavi Erkkola: As of 2015, UNAIDS estimates a total of 36.7 million people living with HIV globally. Of those, 2.1 million are newly infected, with approximately 5,700 new HIV infections a day. Sixty-six percent of all infected by HIV reside in sub-Saharan Africa, and approximately 400 people infected per day there are children under age 15. To effectively combat HIV, we need access to up-to-date information on everything from recent outbreaks and locations of clinics, to in-country educational efforts and inventory levels within healthcare facilities. UNAIDS has a Situation Room at our headquarters in Geneva that gives us access to this kind of worldwide HIV data. But we wanted to build a mobile app that provided global access to the Situation Room data, with more detail at a national, county and facility-level.

We tested out the app in Kenya because the country has a strong appetite for the use of technology to better its citizens’ health. Kenyan government agencies, including the National AIDS Council, encouraged organizations like Kenya Medical Supplies Authority (KEMSA) and the Ministry of Health to contribute their disease control expertise and data to the Situation Room solution. Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta was an early advocate, and has demonstrated his government’s commitment to making data-driven decisions, especially in the fight against HIV and AIDS.

UNAIDS-1

Why did UNAIDS and iVEDiX choose Google Maps, and how did you use Google Maps APIs to build the HIV Situation Room app?

Brian Annechino: In Kenya, more than 80 percent of adults own a cell phone, and Android is by far the most popular operating system. Google Maps APIs are available across all platforms, including native APIs for Android, and Google Maps also offers the kind of fine-grained detail we needed — for example, the locations of more than 7,500 Kenyan healthcare facilities servicing the HIV and AIDS epidemic. Using data from multiple sources along with Google Maps, we can map things like a clinic’s risk of running out of antiretroviral medicine.

Onix, a Google Premier Partner, identified the right Google Maps components to build the app and helped us procure the licensing we needed. We used the Google Maps Android API to build the main interface. Since it was important to have the most accurate and up-to-date map data for Kenya to support the effort, we used the Street View feature of the Google Maps Android API to let people zoom into the street level and see clinics that offer HIV services in locations where Street View imagery is available.

TE: These mapping capabilities are critical because we need to give our county-level users as much insight as possible on service delivery at health facilities. Decision-makers in HIV response are at national and county-level. In this app, we’re able to combine multiple data sources to get a more comprehensive picture of HIV prevention efforts, testing and treatment across these levels.

What kind of data does the HIV Situation Room app display?

TE: The app taps into three data sources. The first is UNAIDS data set about country-by-country HIV estimates. The second is Kenya’s District Health Information System, which has detailed information from all 47 Kenyan counties — everything from the number of people treated at a specific hospital for HIV, to the number of HIV+ pregnant women attending clinics for visits, to the number of condoms distributed by each facility. The third data set will include community level data, which can also contain survey responses from clients about the quality of service they receive.

UNAIDS-2

How does the HIV Situation Room use the data?

TE: By overlaying our inventory data and field notes on a map, we can see patterns and identify trends that help us respond quickly and plan efficiently. For example, if we see breakouts occurring in a particular area, we can monitor HIV test kits in that area or increase educational efforts for target communities.

Have you seen signs that your efforts are making a difference in Kenya?

TE: One of our biggest successes in Kenya is that the app is used by the highest-level decision-makers in the country — President Kenyatta uses the app — as well as people on the front lines fighting HIV, such as program managers. Using the app, policy makers have more information than ever before, and as a result, are able to devise more effective solutions by combining insights at the local and program coordination levels. We see it as an extremely powerful tool for fighting HIV — and we’re looking to bring this tool to other countries in Africa soon.


How Google Maps APIs are fighting HIV in Kenya

Feb 23 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  google cloud maps

In 2015, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) and mobile analytics solutions provider iVEDiX  came together to create the HIV Situation Room, a mobile app designed to help fight the HIV epidemic in Kenya. The app uses Google Maps APIs to create a comprehensive picture of HIV prevention efforts, testing and treatment — and make this programmatic data accessible both to local staff in clinics and others on the front lines, as well as to policy makers.

We sat down with Taavi Erkkola, senior advisor on monitoring and evaluation for UNAIDS, and Brian Annechino, director of government and public sector solutions for iVEDiX, to hear more about the project and why they chose Google Maps APIs to help them in the fight against HIV.

How did the idea for the UNAIDS HIV Situation Room app come about?

Taavi Erkkola: As of 2015, UNAIDS estimates a total of 36.7 million people living with HIV globally. Of those, 2.1 million are newly infected, with approximately 5,700 new HIV infections a day. Sixty-six percent of all infected by HIV reside in sub-Saharan Africa, and approximately 400 people infected per day there are children under age 15. To effectively combat HIV, we need access to up-to-date information on everything from recent outbreaks and locations of clinics, to in-country educational efforts and inventory levels within healthcare facilities. UNAIDS has a Situation Room at our headquarters in Geneva that gives us access to this kind of worldwide HIV data. But we wanted to build a mobile app that provided global access to the Situation Room data, with more detail at a national, county and facility-level.

We tested out the app in Kenya because the country has a strong appetite for the use of technology to better its citizens’ health. Kenyan government agencies, including the National AIDS Council, encouraged organizations like Kenya Medical Supplies Authority (KEMSA) and the Ministry of Health to contribute their disease control expertise and data to the Situation Room solution. Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta was an early advocate, and has demonstrated his government’s commitment to making data-driven decisions, especially in the fight against HIV and AIDS.

UNAIDS-1

Why did UNAIDS and iVEDiX choose Google Maps, and how did you use Google Maps APIs to build the HIV Situation Room app?

Brian Annechino: In Kenya, more than 80 percent of adults own a cell phone, and Android is by far the most popular operating system. Google Maps APIs are available across all platforms, including native APIs for Android, and Google Maps also offers the kind of fine-grained detail we needed — for example, the locations of more than 7,500 Kenyan healthcare facilities servicing the HIV and AIDS epidemic. Using data from multiple sources along with Google Maps, we can map things like a clinic’s risk of running out of antiretroviral medicine.

Onix, a Google Premier Partner, identified the right Google Maps components to build the app and helped us procure the licensing we needed. We used the Google Maps Android API to build the main interface. Since it was important to have the most accurate and up-to-date map data for Kenya to support the effort, we used the Street View feature of the Google Maps Android API to let people zoom into the street level and see clinics that offer HIV services in locations where Street View imagery is available.

TE: These mapping capabilities are critical because we need to give our county-level users as much insight as possible on service delivery at health facilities. Decision-makers in HIV response are at national and county-level. In this app, we’re able to combine multiple data sources to get a more comprehensive picture of HIV prevention efforts, testing and treatment across these levels.

What kind of data does the HIV Situation Room app display?

TE: The app taps into three data sources. The first is UNAIDS data set about country-by-country HIV estimates. The second is Kenya’s District Health Information System, which has detailed information from all 47 Kenyan counties — everything from the number of people treated at a specific hospital for HIV, to the number of HIV+ pregnant women attending clinics for visits, to the number of condoms distributed by each facility. The third data set will include community level data, which can also contain survey responses from clients about the quality of service they receive.

UNAIDS-2

How does the HIV Situation Room use the data?

TE: By overlaying our inventory data and field notes on a map, we can see patterns and identify trends that help us respond quickly and plan efficiently. For example, if we see breakouts occurring in a particular area, we can monitor HIV test kits in that area or increase educational efforts for target communities.

Have you seen signs that your efforts are making a difference in Kenya?

TE: One of our biggest successes in Kenya is that the app is used by the highest-level decision-makers in the country — President Kenyatta uses the app — as well as people on the front lines fighting HIV, such as program managers. Using the app, policy makers have more information than ever before, and as a result, are able to devise more effective solutions by combining insights at the local and program coordination levels. We see it as an extremely powerful tool for fighting HIV — and we’re looking to bring this tool to other countries in Africa soon.


February 2017 Living Atlas Community Webinar Recording Now Available!

Feb 24 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at ArcGIS Blog under tags  arcgis online cartographic design living atlas living atlas community webinar living atlas of the world

The recording of the February 2017 Living Atlas Community Webinar is now available! In this webinar, Jim Herries, Lisa Berry, and Jennifer Bell of Esri’s ArcGIS Content Team presented Esri’s latest SmartMapping techniques and showed how you can use them with Living Atlas layers … Continue reading


Google Sues Uber Over Lidar IP

Feb 24 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at In The Scan under tags  autonomous vehicles

Google parent Alphabet’s Waymo business unit filed a lawsuit claiming that a former employee of Google stole some 14,000 files concerning their lidar-based self-driving navigation system. They claim the former Google employee and founder of Otto, the self driving trucking … Continue reading

The post Google Sues Uber Over Lidar IP appeared first on In The Scan.


Post-Brexit EU Map Shows Independent Scotland

Feb 24 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at The Map Room under tags  brexit eu europe scotland uk

A new post-Brexit map of the European Union shows Scotland as an EU member separate and independent from a rump “United Kingdom of England, Wales and Northern Ireland,” which is coloured like other non-EU members. Commissioned by Interkart and produced by XYZ Maps, the 119 × 84 cm wall map costs £24/40€. Interkart, XYZ Maps. [WMS]


Drone Revolution eBook

Feb 24 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at In The Scan under tags  airborne lidar autonomous vehicles uas uavs

Note – This information is being provided by Aerial Services, Inc. Free Drones Revolution eBook! This eBook is a compilation of articles written by Mike Tully, President & CEO of Aerial Services, Inc., over the last two years about drones … Continue reading

The post Drone Revolution eBook appeared first on In The Scan.


Impervious Surface Mapping using Pro 1.4 – Part 1: Georeferencing

Feb 24 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at ArcGIS Blog under tags  analysis & geoprocessing arcgis pro classification control points error analysis

ArcGIS Pro combines powerful image processing, analysis and visualization capabilities with a practical user interface to enable efficient project workflows.  The Imagery tab is the home for image processing workflows and tasks, such as georeferencing and image classification. The goal … Continue reading